DESCUENTO LECTORES

El primer millón de usuarios de Scoop.it #infografia #infographic #socialmedia

Hola:


Una infografía sobre el primer millón de usuarios de Scoop.it. Vía


Un saludo


El primer millón de usuarios de Scoop.it

El primer millón de usuarios de Scoop.it





Archivado en: Infografía, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Infografía, internet, tic, Web 2.0.



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¿Ha tocado fondo la industria del PC? #infografia #infographic

Hola:


Una infografía sobre si ¿Ha tocado fondo la industria del PC?


Un saludo


Infographic: Has the PC Industry Bottomed Out? | Statista

You will find more statistics at Statista




Archivado en: Economía, Infografía, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Economía, Infografía, informática, tic



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Las Redes Sociales cambian de fans a embajadores de marca #infografia #infographic #marketing

Hola:


Una infogafía que dice que las Redes Sociales cambian de fans a embajadores de marca.


Un saludo


Las Redes Sociales cambian de fans a embajadores de marca

Las Redes Sociales cambian de fans a embajadores de marca





Archivado en: Infografía, Marketing on line, Redes Sociales, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Infografía, internet, Marketing, redes sociales, tic, Web 2.0.



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Card Skimmer Discovered On Payment Kiosk In NYC Subway

wires_and_battery_of_skimming_deviceWhenever I’m in New York City and load up a MetroCard at the train station kiosk, I give the card readers extra scrutiny and think to myself, “such a high-volume spot would be a great place to install a skimmer.” My paranoia was justified: earlier this week, the Metropolitan Transit Authority warned the public that they’ve found card skimmers on a few of those very kiosks.


We’ve covered card skimmers often over the years, because the best way to protect the readers we love from having their card data stolen is through education. If you know what to look for, you won’t be a victim of crude skimmer systems. (Data breaches and more sophisticated skimmers? These tips won’t help you there, unfortunately.)


Here are the photos of one skimmer, both installed on the card machine and removed from it. It looks like grabbing the card-reader portion of the skimmer and trying to pull it loose would have exposed this one, and that may be how the anonymous hero who turned the skimmer in to the MTA discovered it.


That thing that looks like an electric plug? The hole in the bottom is a camera, which captures the keypad while victims enter their PIN.


pin_hole_at_bottom_of_plug_adapter_mounted_to_cable_channel_located_above_mvm_contains_camera


battery_pack_resting_on_top_of_cable_channel_with_wire_going_to_camera_2


battery_pack_with_wire_going_to_camera_inside_view_after_being_removed_from_mounting_area


skimmer_after_being_removed_from_mvm_door


If you’ve passed through the 59th Street-Columbus Circle subway station or the Baldwin station of the LIRR in recent weeks, keep a closer eye than usual on your card statements.


Skimming Device Found On MetroCard Machine At 59th-Columbus Circle Subway Station




by Laura Northrup via Consumerist

Los juegos funcionan en las tiendas de APPs #infografia #infographic #software

Hola:


Una infografía que dice que los juegos funcionan en las tiendas de APPs.


Un saludo


Infographic: Gaming Rules the App Stores | Statista

You will find more statistics at Statista




Archivado en: Infografía, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Infografía, internet, Software, Telefonía, tic



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Appeals Court Denies SeaWorld’s Attempt To Overturn OSHA Violation


The main reason that people nominated and voted for SeaWorld in our recently concluded Worst Company In America tournament was the controversy — highlighted in the documentary Blackfish — over its treatment of orca whales and of the multiple deaths that have been tied to one particular whale. SeaWorld has been fighting workplace safety citations issued following the death of one trainer, but today a federal appeals court ruled against the park.

In Feb. 2010, SeaWorld trainer Dawn Brancheau was killed during a live performance at the park when an orca named Tilikum, who had been involved in two previous fatalities, pulled her into the water and refused to release her before she drowned.


Following this tragic incident OSHA issued three workplace safety violations against SeaWorld, two of them directly related to the death of Brancheau.


One of the citations alleged two instances of a “willful” violation for exposing animal trainers to the recognized hazards of drowning or injury when working with orcas. Specifically, the park was called out for, among other things, allowing the trainers to work with the whales without a protective barrier.


SeaWorld had tried to argue that it was unaware that working with so-called killer whales presented a recognized hazard, but in 2012 an administrative law judge cited not only the previous deaths involving orcas at SeaWorld but also the park’s own safety manuals and training literature in ruling that the park did indeed know that this sort of up-close work presents a real risk to trainers.


That judge said SeaWorld’s safety program related to orcas relied too heavily on trainers to “recognize precursors and prevent unpredictable behavior by the killer whales.”


Added the judge, “SeaWorld holds trainers to a near-impossible standard set by upper management, who engage in a form of Monday morning quarterbacking.”


SeaWorld took its argument up the legal ladder to the U.S. Court of Appeals for the D.C. Circuit, which heard from both sides last November.


Today, the appeals panel issued its ruling, once again siding with OSHA.


“SeaWorld suggests that close contact with these whales was not a recognized hazard because all whales behave differently… But SeaWorld’s incident reports

demonstrate that it recognized the danger its killer whales posed to trainers notwithstanding its protocols,” wrote the court in today’s ruling [PDF]


The court points out that, of the seven orcas at the Orlando SeaWorld at the time of Ms. Brancheau’s death, “a substantial portion of SeaWorld’s killer

whale population had at least one reported incident… Killer whales bit trainers’ body parts on several occasions (although not generally

puncturing skin) and in 2006 a killer whale pulled a trainer underwater by the foot and submerged him repeatedly for approximately 10 minutes.”


There were also numerous instances of trainers being pulled into to water by whales, and of whales lunging out of the water at trainers.


“These incidents constitute substantial evidence to support the [administrative law judge]’s finding that “drywork” [work performed by trainers on dry surfaces around the whale tanks or in shallow water along the edges of the tanks] was also a recognized hazard,” writes the court.


The court also took issue with SeaWorld’s argument that the whales were safe to work with because they were trained to behave in a desirable manner and trainers were taught to identify precursors of aggressive behavior so they could preemptively remove themselves from a bad situation.


“On multiple occasions, including the death of Ms. Brancheau, SeaWorld’s incident reports indicated that the killer whales showed no immediate precursors of aggressive behavior or ignored SeaWorld’s emergency procedures designed to make them cease aggressive behavior,” writes the court.


Rather than the park’s safety and training protocols demonstrating — as SeaWorld claimed they do — that conditions were not unsafe, the court contended that “they demonstrate SeaWorld’s recognition that the killer whales interacting with trainers are dangerous and unpredictable and that even senior trainers can make mistakes during performances.”


Animal rights groups and others that have voiced concern about SeaWorld’s treatment of orcas and their trainers are applauding today’s decision.


“This ruling supports our contention that, from a common sense perspective, it is simply not safe to work in close contact with an intelligent, multi-ton marine predator,” said Dr. Naomi Rose, marine mammal scientist for the Animal Welfare Institute. “The relationship trainers have with these whales is important to the whales, who are social animals, but it’s not safe for the trainers. The fact is orcas don’t belong in captivity in the first place.”




by Chris Morran via Consumerist

A los millenials les gusta el contenido de usuario #infografia #infographic #marketing

Hola:


Una infografía que dice que a los millenials les gusta el contenido de usuario.


Un saludo


A los millenials les gusta el contenido de usuario

A los millenials les gusta el contenido de usuario





Archivado en: Infografía, Marketing on line, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Infografía, internet, Marketing, tic



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