DESCUENTO LECTORES

Dogs Taken By FedEx Driver Returned To Owners; Driver Suspended


On Thursday we told you about the Houston family who claimed that home security footage shows a FedEx delivery driver stealing their two dogs. While the matter is still being investigated, there is good news to report — the puppies are back home where they belong.

A rep for FedEx confirms to Consumerist that the dogs have returned home and the driver, a contract worker for the company, in question is currently not making deliveries pending the outcome of the investigation. Additionally, FedEx says it is cooperating with local authorities.


“We are relieved that the pets are now safe with their owners,” reads a statement from FedEx. “We are taking this incident very seriously and continue to work closely with authorities investigating this matter.”


It’s still unclear exactly why the driver — who was not making a delivery at that home — decided to pick up the French bulldogs and stow them in his FedEx truck.


The dogs were not returned by either the driver or FedEx. Instead, they were spotted wandering the streets on Wednesday night. When the person who took them in brought them to an area veterinary clinic, employees there recognized the dogs from their story on the news and contacted the family to let them know they thought they had found the pups.


“We’re just so happy, we feel like our family’s complete again, really, because we couldn’t go another night without these two,” the dog owner tells KHOU-TV about the return of his family’s canine pals.


His wife, whose Facebook video brought this story to public attention, calls the man a “monster.” She tells KHOU that the family was home when the alleged theft occurred.


“My kids were here, if they would have seen him, how would my children have reacted?” she asks.












by Chris Morran via Consumerist

White House Proposes Free Community College For Dedicated Students


The cost of a college education has outpaced inflation for the last few decades, making school less affordable for millions of Americans and driving student loan debt past the $1 trillion mark. And in the last decade, the for-profit education industry has taken in many billions of dollars in federal student aid for schools with high dropout rates. Today, President Obama offered a suggestion: Free community college educations for those willing to stick to it.

The idea, explains the President, is to give students a leg-up toward a four-year college degree by allowing them to get their first two academic years for free at a community college. Additionally students in two-year occupational training programs may get their entire education funded.


The proposal would provide free education for community college students who are at least half-time students and who maintain a minimum 2.5 (out of a 4.0) grade point average while making progress toward the completion of their program.


The program would be available on an opt-in basis for each state. In those states that choose to participate, qualifying schools will receive federal funding equal to three-quarters of the average cost of community college for eligible students, with the state covering the remaining quarter.


To qualify for participation, a community college must offer either academic programs that “fully transfer credits to local public four-year colleges and universities,” or occupational training programs with high graduation rates that “lead to in-demand degrees and certificates.”


The White House believes that an average student included in this proposal would save around $3,800 a year in school expenses. If adopted by all 50 states, more than 9 million students could be affected.





by Chris Morran via Consumerist

JetBlue Wants Us To Talk About In-Flight Etiquette While We’re On The Ground

jetzzzzWhen you’ve been guzzling coffee and soda during your flight and have to squeeze past two dozing strangers to get to the rest room, what do you do? What do you do? Recently, everyone from on-board animals to airline executives have been behaving like jerks during air travel, and flights have been disrupted because of legroom wars. and JetBlue wants us all to start talking about it while we’re still on the ground.






The company has planned a series of videos that show real-life flight situations exaggerated for comic effect. Two have already been posted, featuring a woman in a window seat with a full bladder, and a sleepy passenger using his neighbor’s shoulder as a pillow.






“We wanted to say, ‘We’ve all been there. We get it, and let’s talk about it,’” the airline’s director of brand management and advertising told Bloomberg News. Yet the airline isn’t telling us how to behave, either: the idea is to make people think about how we behave toward each other while flying, and to discuss the events shown in each video with each other. While we’re still on the ground and not elbow to elbow in the air. That part is really important.


JetBlue Nudges Fliers on Etiquette After Summer of U.S. Air Rage [Bloomberg]




by Laura Northrup via Consumerist

Ejemplos y herramientas para tus indicadores KPI: SEO y Social #infografia #socialmedia #seo

Hola:


Una infografía con Ejemplos y herramientas para tus indicadores KPI: SEO y Social. Vía


Un saludo


Ejemplos y herramientas para tus indicadores KPI: SEO y Social

Ejemplos y herramientas para tus indicadores KPI: SEO y Social





Archivado en: Infografía, Posicionamiento Web, Redes Sociales, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Infografía, internet, posicionamiento, redes sociales, tic, Web 2.0.



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Cómo crear una fan page en FaceBook #infografia #infographic #socialmedia

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Una infografía sobre cómo crear una fan page en FaceBook. Vía


Un saludo


Cómo crear una fan page en FaceBook

Cómo crear una fan page en FaceBook





Archivado en: Infografía, Redes Sociales, Sociedad de la información Tagged: FaceBook, Infografía, internet, redes sociales, tic, Web 2.0.



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Cómo se paga en las tiendas online #infografia #infographic #ecommerce

Hola:


Una infografía sobre cómo se paga en las tiendas online. Vía


Un saludo


Cómo se paga en las tiendas online

Cómo se paga en las tiendas online





Archivado en: Comercio electrónico, Infografía, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Comercio electrónico, Infografía, internet, tic



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Banks Want To Robocall You When It’s Important, But Not Important Enough To Speak To A Human


Under the Telephone Consumer Protection Act, companies can’t robocall you on your cellphone unless you’ve given them prior consent to contact you at that number. Now the banking industry is trying to gain exemptions for this rule, claiming there are times when they just need to call your cellphone even though the need isn’t urgent enough to have an actual human make that call. They also don’t want to be penalized for robocalling the wrong number.

Back in October, the American Bankers Association petitioned the FCC [PDF] for certain exemptions from the TCPA that would allow banks to make certain robocalls to consumers who haven’t given their consent.


Specifically, the ABA is seeking exemptions in four circumstances:


1. To contact consumers about possible fraud or identity theft;

2. To alert consumers of that their personal information may have been breached;

3. To advise consumers on steps they can take to prevent or remedy harm caused by data breaches;

4. To let a customer know of actions needed to arrange for receipt of pending money transfers.


“ABA members strive to make these notifications quickly and efficiently,” reads the petition. “Financial institutions have found that automated communications are best suited to achieve these goals.”


The banks believe that they should be allowed to make these robocalls and texts so long as consumers are not charged for the contact.


But the National Consumer Law Center and several other advocacy groups — Public Citizen, U.S. Public Interest Research Group, Consumer Federation of America, Americans for Financial Reform, and the National Association of Consumer Advocates — have asked the FCC to deny the ABA petition.


In their response [PDF] to the ABA petition, the groups first point out that while the ABA contends that these robocalls would be made without any cost to the recipient, the banks have not yet demonstrated or explained how they could guarantee that these calls would not impact recipients’ phone bills. For that reason alone, argue the groups, the ABA fails to qualify for a TCPA exemption.


But even if the ABA could demonstrate that every single robocall would be made at no expense to the recipient, the advocacy groups take issue with the contention that the message categories are so urgent as to be exempted from the anti-robocall rules.


The NCLC argues that these situations are precisely why the prior consent rule was put into place.


“The banks can inform their customers of the availability of these services, and if they consumers agree that they desire these services they will consent to receive the messages,” reads the response to the petition. “The fact that the messages may be valuable for consumers is a reason that they may wish to consent, not a reason to eliminate the consent requirement. If these messages are important and consumers have not consented to receive them, ABA’s members should take the time to pick up the phone and speak with affected consumers directly, or send and e-mail or a letter.”


To justify the exemptions, say the advocates, the banks must demonstrate that automated calls serve consumer interests more than calls from live operators.


After all, speaking to a real person would (A) guarantee that the message is received, and (B) prevent repeated calls to wrong numbers.


Speaking of which, that brings us to the second TCPA-related petition from the banking industry.


In September, the Consumer Bankers Association petitioned [PDF] the FCC to clarify that’s it’s okay to robocall the wrong number so long as you don’t intend to.


The CBA says that the ability to reassign wireless phone numbers puts businesses in a bad spot when placing robocalls. A bank may have had permission to robocall a number when it belonged to Jill, but when that number eventually ends up in Jack’s hands, they may no longer have permission for the automated message.


“As reassigned number litigation escalates, unreasonably affected parties and overburdened courts now need guidance to identify which party can properly provide prior express consent,” wrote the CBA.


Once again, the NCLC and the advocacy groups — this time joined by our colleagues at Consumers Union — responded [PDF], claiming that banks are seeking a rule change to justify their lazy business practices.


“Companies take for granted that they should be able to call consumers using an autodialer or artificial/prerecorded voice technology,” reads the response, “whether their customers or other consumers actually want the calls or not.”


The advocates point to the CBA’s own claims that it’s impracticable and too costly to manually dial numbers and/or have a real operator instead of a prerecorded message. It is the banking industry’s refusal to use measures that would prevent “wrong number” calls that is leading to complaints and lawsuits, argues the response.


“Frequently, the ‘informational, non-telemarketing’ calls that the CBA promotes are simply a pretext for telemarketing,” contend the advocates. “Frequently, prerecorded voice calls fail to provide any mechanism to opt out or notify the caller that it is calling the wrong person. And frequently, consumers’ do-not-call requests and notifications that a wrong number is being called are completely ignored.”


The NCLC is now calling on the FCC to just say no to more robocalling.


“We hope that the FCC will resist the pressure from business and industry trade groups to weaken rules that prevent robocalls to cell phones without consent,” says NCLC counsel Margot Saunders. “Repeated unauthorized calls and texts to consumers’ cellphones invade privacy and cost money by using their precious minutes or limited text allowances.”


Adds Ellen Taverna, Legislative Director of the National Association of Consumer Advocates, “Maintaining strong protections against these calls creates incentives for the industry to develop methods to avoid harassing people who have not agreed to be called on their cellphones.”




by Chris Morran via Consumerist

El origen de los hashtags en Redes Sociales #infografia #infographic #socialmedia

Hola:


Una infografía sobre el origen de los hashtags en Redes Sociales.


Un saludo


Origin of the #Hashtag in Social Media (#Infographic)

Wrike Collaboration Software




Archivado en: Infografía, Redes Sociales, Sociedad de la información Tagged: Infografía, internet, redes sociales, tic, Web 2.0.



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Síndrome del ojo seco #infografia #infographic #health

Hola:


Una infografía sobre el Síndrome del ojo seco.


Un saludo


Síndrome del ojo seco

Síndrome del ojo seco





Archivado en: Infografía, Salud Tagged: Infografía, Salud



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